Home of the Week: A ‘Passive House’ for International Earth Day

To commemorate International Earth Day, our “Home of the Week” is a newly listed and certified “Passive House” that uses 10% of the energy a standard house does. In fact, at today’s energy costs, this “Passive Home” would net its owner a whopping $193,693 in energy savings over a 30 year period, and over $60K in savings over 10 years. Oh, and the home is beautiful too.

The first day of spring is a day to rejoice in the fact that the winter freeze is (hopefully) behind us; soon to be replaced by sunnier and warmer days. The onset of spring’s warmer weather inevitably brings about more time outside as well as the regrowth of our lawns, trees and gardens. Today isn’t just the first day of spring, it also happens to be International Earth Day; a day established by the United Nations in 1971 to encourage the world to appreciate nature and talk about ways to conserve our awesome planet and its resources.

To commemorate International Earth Day, our “Home of the Week” is a newly listed and certified “Passive House” that uses 10% of the energy a standard house does. In fact, at today’s energy costs, this “Passive Home” would net its owner a whopping $193,693 in energy savings over a 30 year period, and over $60K in savings over 10 years. Oh, and the home is beautiful too.

Located in Bethesda, MD and listed for $1.6 million, this energy efficient home was built by an award-winning builder and architect and features: Over 4,6000 square feet, an open floor plan, top of the line wood floors, a master suite with luxury bathroom, 4 additional bedrooms and 3 baths, a deck and a whole lot more!

Sure it’s a great looking home, but what makes this home truly special is that its one of the only homes east of the Mississippi River that holds the “Passive House” certification.

“Passive House” defines an approach to construction and an energy certification standard. The straightforward approach to building a home like this is the most efficient path to green construction because it focuses on reducing energy demand to the absolute minimum so that only a small amount of expensive technologies are needed to get a home to self sufficiency; or “Net Zero”.

With “Passive House” being the only standard designed specifically to meet the IPCC target of 80% reduction in carbon emissions by 2050, and yearly energy costs of only $350, this home is both great for our environment and sure will save whoever owns it a lot of money!

Innovation doesn’t have to be expensive either. The real value in this mode of building homes and achieving sustainability is the “Passive House” method is easily accessible to architects and builders to replicate. At a cost increase of only 10% above standard construction and training available to professionals everywhere, we believe that more homes across the globe will be built like Erich Cabe’s listing at 4717 North Chelsea Lane. And that’s a good thing.

If you’d like to learn more about this home click here.

Click here to watch a video to learn more about “Passive House” construction.

Consumer Engagement Specialist in the Marketing Department of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. In his role he works on all national TV and online advertising initiatives, heads the brands’ internal video production as well as a slew of other projects. He’s held other roles within the Marketing Department ranging from Previews & Product Development to the day to day management of the coldwellbanker.com redesign. Besides being a marketer, Gustavo is a musician, writer, film & TV buff, avid sports fan, cereal aficionado, traveler, Tumblr and Tweeter.

  • James Clark

    What this house saves in 30 years does not tell the public anything…what does it cost per month in all gas, water, and electric bills..?? My hose was built very tight…cost me a whopping $100 per month in utilities, I only have 2100 square feet, and I feel like mine is better than most..

  • Sarah Rodgers

    James, I think it is standard Passive House. Passive Houses we build usually saves around $200,000 in a lifetime just the square feet is less. James, your home with 2100 square feet consumes a bit more than a standard amount of energy, but it is still really not a lot comparing how much you would spend for a normal house. And I think it’s a mistake made saying that the house is “over 4,6000 square feet”. Maybe it is 4600 which is still a lot. But still I am very happy to hear that people are more and more involved in energy and our planet saving.

    p.s. the publication came out a little bit too soon, as I know Earth Day is observed on April 22 each year.

  • Bob Robert Morison

    Actually it says that the home save around $350 per year. So monthly it would be around $30.And if it is a real number, I am really impressed. We finished a Passive house recently, we got R-53 in the walls, R-80 in the roof, we chose super energy efficient triple pane Intus Windows and doors, Mitsubishi mini split heat pumps. The house does not reach 4600 sq.ft. but monthly energy costs are around $50. So I think you guys did a great job! Congrats!

  • John Sarter

    Fantastic article and fantastic house! I hope appraisers are finally giving credit to the HUGE reductions of operating cost for these homes now… It represents an increase in value and a reduction of the true cost of the home… Not to mention the huge benefit to the entire planet!! :-)

  • Erich Cabe, listing agent

    Total Utility cost for this home average $204/mo. Unbelievable for a 4 level home just under 4700 sq ft!

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