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A Simple Tip for Home Sellers: Declutter

The following is a guest post from Mike Randall an associate broker with Coldwell Banke Pinnacle Properties in Florence, Alabama. Buyers won’t buy what they can’t see. It’s really that simple. When you’re selling a home, it is critical to make sure that you are showing potential buyers the features and benefits your home has […]

The following is a guest post from Mike Randall an associate broker with Coldwell Banke Pinnacle Properties in Florence, Alabama.

Buyers won’t buy what they can’t see. It’s really that simple.

When you’re selling a home, it is critical to make sure that you are showing potential buyers the features and benefits your home has to offer and not your “stuff”.  A room with lots of knickknacks and excessive furniture can make a buyer feel overwhelmed and claustrophobic.

As a Seller, when you have the opportunity to show your home, make the absolute most of it.  If you can’t decide what needs to go and what needs to stay, ask yourself this question: Is it necessary? If the answer is “NO”, then get it out of the house. Don’t over think it.

Don’t expect your potential buyer to “see through it” when it comes to clutter. Most people will not take the time to visualize what your home will look like if it’s cluttered. You only have a few minutes, possibly seconds, to make an impression on your buyer when they walk in the door. Take the time and the effort to be sure your home is properly decluttered to ensure the best showing possible.

 

Image courtesy of Flickr user puuikibeach

Husband. Father. Socializer. Mets Lifer. TV Afficianado. Consumer Engager.

David Marine is the Vice President of Brand Engagement for Coldwell Banker where he oversees the brand’s content strategy including acting as managing editor for the Coldwell Banker blog and heading up video production efforts. While Vice President by day, David runs a three ring circus at night as he is the father of 4 boys. He also happens to be married to Wonder Woman. True story.

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