How to Build an Outdoor Fire Pit

Summer is almost here. Upgrade your backyard with this sizzling hot DIY project.

Fire pits are red hot in the world of landscaping right now. While hiring a professional is the easier route, building one is not as difficult as it sounds. Check out this great tutorial from the DIY Experts from Homes.com.

image via olyeller.com

Lindsay is the the Senior Manager of Media Engagement for Coldwell Banker Real Estate and manages the brand’s media and social media department. She is also a licensed real estate professional. In 2017, she was named a top 20 social influencer in the real estate industry in the annual Swanepoel 200 power rankings.

Lindsay lives in Livingston, NJ with her college sweetheart and now husband Joe and recently welcomed another Joe into her life as she became a mom in June 2016. Lindsay and her two Joes love spending their time playing with their cat Rory, watching sports and vacationing in Cape Cod.

5 Comments

  1. How to Build an Outdoor Fire Pit | Elaine Allinson's Blog
    April 25, 2014

    […] post How to Build an Outdoor Fire Pit appeared first on Coldwell Banker Blue […]

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  2. How to Build an Outdoor Fire Pit | Earl Forbes Blog
    April 25, 2014

    […] post How to Build an Outdoor Fire Pit appeared first on Coldwell Banker Blue […]

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  3. How to Build an Outdoor Fire Pit | Donna Dagley's Blog
    April 25, 2014

    […] post How to Build an Outdoor Fire Pit appeared first on Coldwell Banker Blue […]

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  4. How to Build an Outdoor Fire Pit | Janet Glowacki's Blog
    April 25, 2014

    […] post How to Build an Outdoor Fire Pit appeared first on Coldwell Banker Blue […]

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  5. dennis
    April 25, 2014

    I don’t think this is a very good fire pit. It should have been deeper, 12 inches, with the first course being entirely below grade. About 3 courses above grade. Packing stone would be best below grade. It sits level and drains. I would use more than dabs of adhesive and would an adhesive that withstands temperature. If you really want it to last you would also use a steel liner. A few hot fires and 2-3 years and this one will suffer and need work. I would also tend to use a different stone for a cap layer but that isn’t needed. It is wider and makes an artistic statement but is not needed for being sturdy. Just my thoughts.

    Reply

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