Portraits of What Moves Her

SHARE Last year, Coldwell Banker® created What Moves Her℠ for women in the real estate industry to help develop their leadership abilities and fully realize their professional development goals. What Moves Her now offers a virtual series through the end of the year that will feature conversations between real estate leaders and topic experts. The […]

Last year, Coldwell Banker® created What Moves Her℠ for women in the real estate industry to help develop their leadership abilities and fully realize their professional development goals. What Moves Her now offers a virtual series through the end of the year that will feature conversations between real estate leaders and topic experts. The virtual series, Portraits of What Moves Her, will tackle topics that are relevant to the current climate, including resilient leadership, overcoming obstacles, increasing your emotional I.Q. and more. The monthly conversations will take place on the third Wednesday of the month.

Upcoming Event

What Moves Her at Virtual Gen Blue!
Thursday, September 17th at 1 pm PST/ 4pm EST:

Click here to learn more and register for the special session.

2020 has certainly been filled with rough waters. In order to successfully navigate ourselves through the swells, we need to pop our he

ads out of the water and pivot our trajectory. As a two-time Olympic gold medalist in swimming, Summer Sanders knows a thing or two about streamlining through waves to find success. Join Summer and Sue Yannaccone, Executive Vice President of Coldwell Banker Realty, as they discuss the power behind the pivot. Summer will share her experience with overcoming obstacles in training for the Olympics, finding her footing in the world of broadcast and how she has applied those lessons to life on dry land. Be prepared to be inspired and to take notes on tactics to implement into your business approach as you adjust strategy in this unpredictable climate. This live session will field questions from the audience and provide opportunities for interaction.

 

 

PAST EVENTS

Portraits of What Moves Her:  Prioritizing Wellness and Yourself

This session discussed prioritizing yourself and your wellness. August is National Wellness Month, dedicated to self-care, creating healthy routines & stress management. Delia Passi, Founder and Chief Mission Officer of Women’s Choice Award will be our special guest to tackle this important topic. Delia has spent her entire career dedicated to understanding the female consumer, with a special expertise in women’s consumer, healthcare and workplace issues. She is the former publisher of Working Woman and Working Mother magazines, author of Winning the Toughest Customer: The Essential Guide to Selling to Women, and a renowned speaker. Delia is a trailblazer on raising the bar on the customer experience for women. In 2010 the Women’s Choice Award was launched to help women make smart choices through the collective recommendation of women on brand preferences. As a breast cancer survivor, Delia understands the importance of prioritizing health and happiness.

You can listen to the conversation via podcast here or you can watch the entire conversation here:

Delia’s Snapshot:

Q: What was the greatest challenge you faced? Tough question as every challenge you face seems to be the toughest at the time, then in retrospect you realize that in the scheme of things it made you stronger.  But if forced to choose one I would say it was when I decided to start my own business and four months later I was diagnosed with Stage 2 Breast Cancer.  I was also the breadwinner in the family and the mother of three teenage girls, so as you can imagine on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the worst my stress score was 10. IN the beginning getting my head focused on my business and family while enduring treatment was definitely a challenge I pray never to repeat.   

Q: How were you able to overcome that challenge? It became a mental exercise. Lots of visualization and frankly a lot of conversations with myself.  I had to be my greatest cheerleader, allowing myself to cry when needed but learning how to refocus quickly to get to the end goal. I also sought out others who shared similar experiences as support. Just knowing that others could “make it through and thrive” was the inspiration I needed, especially when the light at the end of the tunnel looked awfully dim.  

Q: What is the most important lesson you learned?  How to lead.  Successful leaders are not born, they are students for life on how to inspire, communicate and help others reach their potential.

Q: What keeps you up at night? Growing a business during a pandemic, when the world we know it is warped.

Q: Whom do you most admire? I have a great deal of admiration for environmental activist, Greta Thunberg.  I am inspired by this 16 year old who demonstrates so much conviction, courage and leadership, and the determination to lead her generation in changing the world for the better.

Q: What is one skill they don’t teach you in school but should? I have a couple things.  Most importantly is how to effectively communicate.  The most important skill of all in business.  Second, especially for women is how to articulate your value proposition.  It’s a selling skill but without it will hold you back from reaching your potential.  

Q: What is your motto?  I’ve become a more tolerant person than I once was, with less willingness to impose my standards, norms and perspectives on others, so I guess “Live and Let Live” best sums up my attitude.

Taking Control of Your Career

This session discussed empathy, diversity and taking control of your career. Tanya Reu-Narvaez, Human Resources Vice President for Realogy will be discussing these important topics with Passion Broussard, Listing Concierge Manager for Coldwell Banker. Passion is a professional speaker, who conducts training workshops, conference keynotes, and breakout sessions on courageous decision making, leading with curiosity, empathy, ethics, and encouragement in life and business.

You can listen to the conversation via podcast here or you can watch the entire conversation here:

 

Passion’s Snapshot

Q: What was the greatest challenge you faced?
Passion: Having a child with a life-threatening disease. It broke me open in a way where I had no choice but to see the world and myself differently. I learned to see the world through his eyes. Through the journey with him I’ve learned to be radically empathetic, unapologetic, authentic, and align myself, and my life, with what and whom is important to me.

Q: How were you able to overcome that challenge?
Passion: Witnessing the strength of my child (over and over again), feeling the love of my family, having the support of my friends and medical community, and knowing the Grace of God.

Q: What is the most important lesson you learned?
Passion: To stay in curiosity and treat my life like it’s a classroom. Every day brings the opportunity to learn something new – and I’m whole heartedly open to that. I love the idea of growing wiser, stronger, more understanding and connected with each day that passes. Staying in curiosity allows me to keep an open mind and have deeper empathy as it pertains to all people, things, and the world around me.

Q: What keeps you up at night?
Passion: Missing any opportunity to encourage, uplift, or empower another. Seriously, I think about this from moment to moment on a daily basis! There are so many people that have impacted my life and I’m frequently, and forever, grateful for them; for the time they invested to show me that they saw me, they heard me, they believed in me, and that they cared. I want to make sure that I’m doing that for as many people as I can for as long as I’m able.

Q: Whom do you most admire?
Passion: Michelle Obama. I love that she has a clear sense of who she is and she doesn’t let anyone else define her. She is a role model and leader in every sense of the two words. She’s beautiful, fearless, intelligent, graceful, inspiring, and might I add – a style icon!

Q: What is one skill they don’t teach you in school but should?
Passion: The importance of respecting and appreciating individuality. Our world is not a “one size fits all” place – and everyone shouldn’t feel the need to fit into a box. If as kids we learned this in school, during some of our most formative years, maybe as adults our hearts and minds would be that much more open to people and things we weren’t used to or didn’t understand.

Q: What is your motto?
Passion: That whatever happens in my life is working for me, not against me. I’ve had a lot of adversity in my life but I’ve also had many great opportunities and experiences. That said, I believe it’s the challenges and adversity in life that show us who we are – that ultimately shape and define who we become.

Overcoming Obstacles with Sally Roberts

Sally Roberts Bio for download — Wrestle Like A Girl

Sometimes finding your passion and the power of your own voice requires blood, sweat and tears. This is the reality of the cliff note version of Sally Robert’s story, which includes being an elite woman wrestler, combat Army veteran, sports psychologist and founder of the advocacy organization, Wrestle Like a Girl. Sally believes that girls can do anything and that through sport, they can realize their full potential. She is living proof that girls can indeed do anything as she was the youngest of three children growing up and the first in her family to graduate high school, graduate college and earn an advanced degree. 

You can listen to the conversation via podcast here or you can watch the entire conversation here:

Sally’s Snapshot

Q: What was the greatest challenge you faced?

Sally: The greatest challenge I ever faced was looking in the mirror and seeing that I was valuable, worthy and I could stand as an independent woman on my own two feet. Regardless of race, class or social status… there messages that we hear, both intentionally and unintentionally, about where our position in life “should” be. It has taken some very bold and courageous steps for me to realize that narrative or story we heard, and more times than not believe,  is not true. The only limits are the ones we impose on ourselves.

Q: How were you able to overcome that challenge?

Sally: First, it’s an endurance race and I am finding I always have to work it. I am constantly putting myself in situations where I was comfortable with being uncomfortable. I have a “reality list” of what I’ve identified as weakness that I need to improve on and do the work to make my weakness less weak and my strengths stronger, and have a solid support network of people who push me to be better from my family, friends and colleagues who encourage and support my rise in every facet… business, personal relationship, self-growth. And I have specifically surrounded myself for people who both love me as I am and support me in the pursuit of excellence.

When we treat man as he is, we make him worse than he is; when we treat him as if he already were what he potentially could be, we make him what he should be. –Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)

Q: What is the most important lesson you learned?

Sally: Be easy on yourself. We all start out in different spaces and places and learn as we go with the knowledge, we’ve acquired from our life experiences. We’re bound to fail but we must fail forward. No one, absolutely no one, can make you feel inferior without your permission. I often think of a line from Brene Brown… I refuse to accept criticism from people who are not in the arena marred with dust and blood from doing the work. For those who are marred, I will gladly open dialogue to engage in civil discourse to find better, more collaborative ways forward that are positive, inclusive, and big-hearted.

Q: What keeps you up at night?
Sally:
The mission of Wrestle Like A Girl to empower girls and women using the sport of wrestling to become leaders in life. Girls need a voice and we should not expect, demand or require them to be their own advocates… we must do that for them.

Q: Whom do you most admire?
Sally: Nelson Mandela – he saw that sport was a great unifier and was unapologetic about its use to build bridges, open hearts, and facilitate peace.

Q: What is one skill they don’t teach you in school but should?
Sally: The language of money. It’s the most spoken language in the world yet many people, especially women, don’t know it so they can’t even in be in conversations or rooms to determine how it’s allocated.

Q: What is your motto?
Sally: I don’t have a motto, but I have a quote I love… “You have enemies? Good. That means you stood up to something, sometime in your life.” – Winston Churchill

Resilient Leadership with Sue Yannaccone and Liz Gehringer

The first Portraits of What Moves Her virtual event on Wednesday, May 20th featured Liz Gehringer, chief operating officer of Coldwell Banker, and Susan Yannaccone, executive vice president of Coldwell Banker, on the topic of Resilient Leadership. You can listen to the conversation via podcast here or you can watch the entire conversation here:

 

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